Pruning Leucadendrons – How To Prune A Leucadendron Plant

Pruning Leucadendrons – How To Prune A Leucadendron Plant

By: Liz Baessler

Leucadendrons are fascinating and beautiful flowering plants native to South Africa. The flowers are bright and have a certain prehistoric look to them that is sure to please…as long as you know how to care for them. Keep reading to learn more about how and when to prune leucadendrons to get the most out of their flowering potential.

How to Prune a Leucadendron Plant

Leucadendrons bloom in the spring, then continue to put out fresh growth throughout the summer. As the plant is flowering, it’s a good idea to remove spent blooms to keep it neat and to encourage more blooms. Cutting back a leucadendron is earnest is best done after the flowers have all passed.

Leucadendron pruning is not an exact science, and the plants can take a lot of shearing very forgivingly. The main thing to understand is that a woody stem with no leaves is not likely to put out new growth. Because of this, it’s important when pruning leucadendrons to always leave some new, leafy growth with each cut.

Leucadendron Pruning

Once your leucadendron plant is done flowering for the spring, remove all the spent blooms. Next, cut all the green stems back so there are at least 4 sets of leaves remaining. Don’t cut back so far that you reach the woody, leafless part of the stem, or no new growth will appear. As long as there are still leaves on each stem, you can cut the plant down pretty drastically.

Throughout the growing season, your pruned leucadendron will put out lots of new growth in a more attractive, denser shape, and the following spring it should produce more flowers. The plant should not need to be pruned again for another year, at which point you can perform the same cutting action.

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How To Grow Leucadendron Plant

Leucadendron [Lew-kuh-DEN-dron] is a genus of flowering plants, belonging to the family: Proteaceae (protea).

There are around 80 varieties of this plant, including:

  • Leucadendron Salignum
  • Leucadendron Laureolum
  • Inca Gold
  • Pisa
  • Leucadendron Argenteum

This evergreen shrub is a native to South Africa but is also easily grown in different parts of the world and introduced to New Zealand in the 1960s.

The Greek name of this plant is a somewhat misnomer – ‘Leukos’ means white, and ‘dendron’ means tree.

Although white Leucadendrons are found, these plants mostly have vivid colors.

These plants are famous for their bright colors and low maintenance.

They are an ideal choice for drought-prone, hot weather gardens.

The common names of this plant include:

  • Conebush
  • Silver tree
  • Safari Sunset


How do you plant a leucadendron?

Explore more on it. Similarly, it is asked, can you grow leucadendron from cuttings?

Cuttings are best taken in early spring or early autumn and placed in a cutting mix of 75 per cent coarse sand and 25 per cent peat moss. The pots should be placed in a propagating bed with both heating and misting in full sun.

Similarly, how tall do Leucadendrons grow? 4 to 6 feet

Beside above, how do you care for a leucadendron?

Use a slow-release, low-phosphorus fertilizer, as leucadendrons don't care for phosphorus. Prune leucadendron to shape the plant and to encourage bushy new growth and flowers the next spring. Prune young plants when the weather is cool in late spring or later in the season.

When should I cut back my leucadendron?

Leucadendrons bloom in the spring, then continue to put out fresh growth throughout the summer. As the plant is flowering, it's a good idea to remove spent blooms to keep it neat and to encourage more blooms. Cutting back a leucadendron is earnest is best done after the flowers have all passed.


Leucadendron Plant Uses

These plants look stunning with other garden plants such as the Leucospermum, Banksia, and Grevillea (silk oak), mainly due to their bright colors.

Their eccentric bracts make beautiful cut flowers.

The bigger varieties look attractive on their own as well.

These plants are also used in different floral arrangements.

Pair them with ornamental grasses, pines, dwarf conifers, and succulents, like Echeveria, Euphorbia, Senecio, and ice plant in a Mediterranean garden.


Watch the video: Growing proteas in pots - 1 year update - mimetes, leucospermum, banksia - best potting mix.