What Is Beebrush: Learn How To Grow Whitebrush Plants

What Is Beebrush: Learn How To Grow Whitebrush Plants

By: Tonya Barnett, (Author of FRESHCUTKY)

For many home growers, attracting bees and other pollinators to the garden is an important aspect of a productive season. While there are a variety of options in terms of attracting these beneficial insects, many opt for the planting of local, native perennial flowers.

These plants are prized for their ease of growth, adaptability to regional growing conditions, as well as their bloom time and dependability. Aloysia whitebrush entices bees with its strong vanilla-scented flowers, which are produced throughout the entire warm growing season.

What is Beebrush?

Before determining whether this plant is a good candidate for the yard, it will first be important to delve deeper into whitebrush information. Also known as beebrush or Texas whitebrush (Aloysia gratissima), Aloysia whitebrush plants are native to regions of Mexico and the southwestern United States.

These plants make an ideal perennial choice for growth in arid regions and for use in xeriscaped lawns, as they have demonstrated noted tolerance to drought and direct sun. And, as its common name beebrush suggests, it is also considered a “honey plant,” as bees create a delicious honey from the nectar.

Reaching up to ten feet (3 m.) in height, plants should be placed carefully. When given the right growth conditions, large plants may easily spread and/or outcompete surrounding plants. It should also be noted that the plant is toxic to some livestock and should not be allowed to grow near grazing animals.

How to Grow Whitebrush

Learning how to grow whitebrush plants is relatively simple, provided proper conditions are met. Hardy to USDA growing zone 8, plants can be obtained through a variety of means. Most commonly plants are started from seed. Seed should be collected in fall when pods have fully dried and turned brown.

The selection of a growing site will be a key to success with this plant. Aloysia whitebrush plants thrive in soil that is less than ideal. This includes those which are exceptionally dry, rocky, or otherwise unsuitable for other garden ornamentals. In fact, it is common for this plant to be found growing in previously disturbed areas. Beebrush plants will grow best in soil with low fertility.

Plants should be situated in a location which receives full sun, though they will grow in areas with part shade. It should be noted, however, that a decrease in sunlight hours may also lead to an overall decrease in flowering throughout the season.

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Slender, densely branched deciduous shrub, 3 to 10 feet tall, 8 feet in spread. Fragrant foliage. White to yellow flowers appear in spring to fall with strong vanilla scent. 1 to 3 inch spikes. Flowers attractive to butterflies and bees. This is a honey plant. Aloysia gratissima is toxic to horses.

Low water use, drought tolerant, tolerates poorly drained soils.


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Slender, densely branched deciduous shrub that can grow up to 10 feet tall, 8 feet in spread. Fragrant foliage. White to yellow flowers appear in spring to fall with strong almond scent.

The plant is very fast growing especially when planted in the ground, providing full sun and good watering. It needs good drainage and doesn't like waterlogged conditions. In a pot, it can be kept as a compact specimen.

3492 Aloysia virgata - Almond Bush

Almond Bush, White flowers have strong almond scent.
Slender, densely branched deciduous shrub, 3 to 10 feet tall, 8 feet in spread. Fragrant foliage. White to yellow flowers appear in spring to fall with strong almond scent. attractive to butterflies and bees. This is a honey plant. Low water use, drought tolerant.
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Verbena

Verbena x hybrida 'Romance Mixed'
Garden Verbena, Verbena hortensis
These low, fast-growing plants have clusters of small fragrant flowers that make solid masses of color in sunny places. Useful for edging, ground covers, rock gardens and containers. Flowers come in solid colors or with white centers.

Verbenaceae:
Members of this family are undergoing lots of reorganization. Since the verbenaceae often resemble the mints (Lamiaceae), with their flowers and stems, certain species have been improperly grouped in Verbenaceae. It is believed that the relationships between these families may be convergent.

Verbena peruviana Red verbena
S. America 10 x 70cm
Planting position: Full sun.Not suited to very humid regions, nor to regions with extreme frost.Provide additional watering for drier areas.Spacing of 50cm.
Requires regular watering, during ongoing dry spells especially.Compost-enriched soil.

speciosa 'Imagination'
ver-BEE-nah spee-see-OH-sah
This outstanding hybrid blooms from spring until frost and has beautifully dissected foliage. Innumerable clusters of purple blossoms cover this plant and look fantastic cascading over the edges of a hanging basket.

is a roughly hairy, slender perennial with a woody stalk and several stiffly erect stems. Flowering occurs from early July to late September with the small but attractive blue flowers arranged in elongated, slender terminal spikes.

features purplish-blue flowers, which bloom on tall spikes, a few at a time from bottom to top, June-September. The flowers are a.

s are sun-loving perennials, though they are often grown as annuals in cold climates. Even where winters are mild, they rarely live for over two or three years, so many gardeners treat them as annuals.

ceae is in the major group Angiosperms (Flowering plants).
Statistics are at the bottom of the page.

seeds grow into a tender perennial, which is often treated as an annual. The tall wispy stems topped by rich lavender flowers, make an architectural statement in the garden.

annual, easy care
created by dragonfly
zones: 7a thru 11a .

hastata plant characteristics
Click on a characteristic from the list below to see a list of other plants that share that characteristic.
Plant Type .

Seeds and Plants
Delightful in pots, baskets and tubs, they are also charming in the front of flower beds.
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) - An evergreen perennial to 1 to 2 feet tall and spreading wider from underground by rhizomes.

and does it just have another name I did not know about?

is one of the best summer blooming meadow plants anywhere! Tall with green fuzzy foliage, this becomes a rounded bush by mid-summer that tops itself in July with spikes of pinkish-lavender flowers. Butterflies love the constant summer blooms! .

is a PERENNIAL growing to 1.5 m (5ft) by 0.6 m (2ft in).
It is hardy to zone (UK) 3. It is in flower from Jul to August. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees, flies, lepidoptera, self.The plant is self-fertile.

bonariensis L. var. bonariensis (misapplied) .

Family pictures
at PlantSystematics.org.

simplex Leym.
Narrow-leaf vervain is believed to be extirpated in Connecticut, though it is more common farther west. The photographs show cultivated plants.

grows fast and will make a quick groundcover for any bare spots in the yard.

is a weedy species often found at the edges of roads, sidewalks, parking lots, lawns and other disturbed sandy or gravelly soils, fanning out in a mat up to nearly 2 feet in diameter but rarely rising more than 2 or 3 inches off the ground.
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Spreading habit fine-textured leaves needs good drainage attracts butterflies there are many types of

is V.bipinnatifida cut back to 3" if needed in winter
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Grow Green .

Revised by Joey Williamson, HGIC Horticulture Extension Agent, Clemson University, 09/15. Originally prepared by Karen Russ, HGIC Horticulture Specialist, Clemson University. New 04/04. Images added 09/07.
HGIC 1175 .

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(syn. Lippia citriodora)
Genus: Aloysia
Species: citrodora .

x hybrida 'Coral Red.' It is suited as a groundcover in the xeriscape garden, or for fountaining out of baskets or window boxes.

ceae:
= Select by Species Name = Clerodendrum thomsoniae Lantana camara Lantana montevidensis = Select by Common Name = Bleeding Glory-Bower 'Pot of Gold' Yellow Sage .

from the clean sandy areas of the Mojave desert, southern end of the San Joaquin Valley, and on slopes above the desert/valley in the Pinyon Juniper Woodland/Juniper Woodland/Joshua Tree Woodland.

simplex)
Plant Type: This is a herbaceous plant which can reach 50cm in height (20inches).
Leaves: The leaf arrangement is opposite. Each narrow leaf is toothed and widest past the middle.
Flowers: The flowers have 5 Regular Parts and are up to 0.

Flower - How to Care and Grow
The small-growing, bushy West Indian Lantana is very popular in local gardens and on balconies and patios. Ideally, the plant is kept in a pot, as it is hardy only limitedly and in very mild areas without any frosts.

The essence of Lemon-Grass, or Andropogon Schoenanthus, should not be confused with that of Lemon-Scented

Search for recent Yellow Sand-

ceae) -- This plant has several medicinal uses, and is still listed in modern herbals. Vervain blooms in late summer. (Photographed in PA) .

Named by Dr. Alan Armitage, of the University of Georgia. Vigorously spreading, deep purple clusters from June to November. Excellent clean, deep green foliage with a trailing habit. Has been surviving the winter here lately, but it gets a very slow start in the spring.

species
Plants of Home and Garden
Sow outside around last frost date, or start indoors early spring, just covered, keep dark to germinate 65-70F/18-21C. Set out in 4 weeks. Good light, and fertile soil does well under scorching sun.

bud moth (scientific name Endothenia hebesana) is the second most serious iris pest after the iris borer. These pests are a great botheration for iris breeders because they devastate the iris seeds when they are maturing inside the seedpods.

officinalis) (maceration of 100 g of root in a liter of red wine for a whole day. Drain well and take a couple of drinks a day)
Is tea suitable for anemia?

(Aloysia triphylla the synonym citriodora is still sometimes incorrectly used for this species) is a tender deciduous woody shrub native to South and Central America (Zones 8-10) with a strong lemon scent to the foliage, which is retained even when dried.

(Aloysia triphylla) is her favorite herb. She loves to smell its lemon-lime fragrance when the wind blows and uses the leaves in teas and fruit salads. She starts this perennial from cuttings it does best in a pot on the patio.

bipinnatifida
Vibrant lavender flower clusters are held erect above spreading stems with deeply cut leaves. This beautiful groundcover blooms from late spring through frost. A durable Great Plains perennial that is attractive to butterflies. Read more here. Tips from the pros: Prefers well-drained, native soil.

, puriri) family
Also known as
Lantana scabrida, Camara vulgaris, wild sage, red-flowered sage, and largeleaf lantana are similar .

ceae stubs
Hidden categories:
Articles with 'species' microformats
Commons category with page title same as on Wikidata
All stub articles .

ceae
Annual
Civil Rights and Non-Discrimination Information
This site is maintained by the Center for Agriculture, Food and the Environment .

Bonariensis (6 Plants)
Sold by Hardy Plants Online
£ 20.00
£21.00 .

ceae are herbs, shrubs or trees that may be recognised easily. The plants are often aromatic, the opposite leaves are usually serrate, the stem is often angled and with a line across the node, and the often rather weakly monosymmetric flowers are borne in racemes or heads.

or rose vervain) is a Missouri native perennial that occurs in prairies, fields, pastures, rocky glades, roadsides and waste areas in the central and southern parts of the State (Steyermark).


Genus of about 150 species of evergreen shrubs and perennials from tropical North, Central, and South America, and South Africa. In areas where it is adapted it can become a weed. In northern areas, the plant is used as an annual bedding plant or a pot plant.

Quartz XP Red with Eye
Quartz XP Red with Eye
Rich colors and elegance made easy - attracts butterflies! .

ceae
For the avid herb gardener with an interest in medicinal plants Lippia javanica with its dense creamy white, flower heads and aromatic leaves.
Read More .

ceae.
Lighting: Require full sun. Once the desired style is attained, leaves may be dwarfed by stripping all the leaves off and later removing any which grow to be too large.
Temperature: Zone 9b. Lantana is a tropical plant which should be protected from cold weather.

ceae
Additional Common Names
SILVER SPIRE CHASTE TREE, SILVER SPIRE VITEX .

I've heard and read of Lemon

in Victorian gardens, but had no idea there was a red! How beautiful. They are fragrant and as you can see they certainly don't mind a bit of dry weather. Most common are the purples.
Annuals For The Future.

Aloysia gratissima, Lippia lycioides, Aloysia lycioides (Whitebrush, Beebrush, Family:

Scraggly And Browning With Few Flowers
Tulip Stems Damaged And Look Like They Have Been Peeled Two Thirds Up
Should Petunias Be Deadheaded Or Pinched Back
Will Soil Solarization Harm Wanted Plants Too
Viburnum Plant Did Not Bloom And Has No Leaves On Middle Portion .

ceae Category: houseplants, landscape, perennials, Color: blues, Caryopteris clandonensis ( Blue Mist Shrub ) .

] Common Name List
(plant images and info)
Viola tricolor [Johnny-jump-up] Common Name List
(plant images and info)
Viola Ч wittrockiana [Pansy] Common Name List .

The most often used flowers are rose petals, lavender, lemon

, rose geranium and tuberose. Do not hesitate to try different varieties. If it has rained recently, wait until two days after the rain before harvesting material. Dry the material on a piece of screen wire suspended off surface.

, salvia, rudbeckia and coreopsis all work very well in pots. Vining plants like variegated vinca, black-eyed Susan vine, hyacinth bean and morning glory can add a different dimension to containers. For height, use plants like canna, spider flower, spike or cosmos.

There are many varieties and hybrids of scrub

available.
Lantana blooms year round and attracts butterflies for pollination to the garden.
The berry-like fruit is juicy, first green later black-purplish poisonous for animals and for humans as well, if overdosed.

The Lantana genus is in the

ceae) and includes 150 species of flowering perennials.
Lantana camara is by far the most cultivated species and includes 100s of beautiful cultivars to choose from.
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Lippia citriodora synonym of Aloysia triphylla (Lemon

)
Lippia incisa synonym of Phyla nodiflora (Turkey Tangle Fogfruit, Creeping Lip Plant)
Lippia lycioides synonym of Aloysia gratissima (Whitebrush)
Lippia nodiflora synonym of Phyla nodiflora (Turkey Tangle Fogfruit, Creeping Lip Plant) .

Aloysia tripbylla, syn. Lippia citriodora (lemon-scented

). Height 1.5 m (5 ft), spread 1.2 m (4 ft). Though somewhat tender, this is worth growing for its scented loliage. It is deciduous and needs a warm wall.

hybrid
SupertuniaВ® Black CherryВ® Petunia hybrid
SuperbellsВ® Red Calibrachoa hybrid .

hardy plants grow and reproduce quickly - they are often dormant during extreme weather (droughts, heat spells, cold spells, etc.). Their seeds are drought resistant. These plants often live in areas with harsh climates, like deserts and very cold areas. Some ephemerals include: Desert Paintbrush, Desert Sand

The rough, hairy, lanceolate leaves are pinnate and opposite, in pairs. The stems are stiff and square. This introduced species is not found too often in the northern half of Ireland, being mainly confined to the more southerly half. It belongs to the

portulaca, prickly myrtle, red tassel flower, rose everlasting, rudbeckia, scarlet cordia, salipigossis, salvia, scabiosa, snow plant, snow-on-the-mountain, Spanish bayonet, spider flower (cleome), star-of-the-veldt, statice, stock, sweet pea, sweet William (in Scotland, Stinking Willy), trumpet flower vines,


Bottle Brush Tree Care

Once established, care is super-simple: water it when the soil starts to dry out, and give it some fertilizer at regular intervals. Young plants require a little more preparation, though.

Read on to find out the best way to prepare your bed and care for your bottle brush tree!

Light

A red-flowered melaleuca nervosa. Source: Arthur Chapman

Before you plant your bottle brush plant, it’s important to be sure your sun conditions are going to be right.

First, consider your bottle brush tree species. The vast majority of them prefer full sun, but there are a few of the shrubbing types which can tolerate partial shade.

Second, make sure that sun will reach that spot in the winter. A south-facing placement usually ensures you should have adequate sunlight for most callistemons all year.

As bottle brush plants do well in zones 9-11 normally, they tend to have good resistance to too much heat. They won’t like the cold, however. Some varieties can take low temperatures, but they are not able to handle repeated frost conditions.

If you live in a location where you get snow or extremely cold conditions during the winter, you should keep your bottle brush tree in a shrubbery-type growth type and plant it in a container. That way, you can optimize placement for light, and it can be brought indoors with a grow light for the winter months.

Older bottle brush trees which have gained significant growth can tolerate cold weather better than those which are young.

Water

The average bottle brush is going to prefer regular watering, but it won’t necessarily require daily watering as these plants tend to be somewhat drought-resistant.

Depending on its specific species, age or size, watering requirements vary widely. However, a good rule of thumb during the first year or two is to check the top four inches of soil at the base of the plant. If it is damp, you’re giving it enough water. If it’s powdery and dry, it needs watering.

To develop a good root system, I recommend slow, deep watering patterns. Using a drip system or soaker hose will provide these conditions and help encourage the root mass to expand as necessary.

Established plants that are more than two years old are much more drought-resistant than younger plants. These have had plenty of time to establish a good root system. Water older bottle brush trees during prolonged dry periods or when trying to stimulate flowering.

You’re welcome to water more often, as long as the soil drains really well. However, be careful not to overwater!

Bottle brush trees can withstand short periods of flooding, but try to avoid standing water once floodwaters recede.

Melaleuca nervosa bark, also known as paperbark. Source: Arthur Chapman

Bottle brush trees grow well in a wide variety of soil conditions. In the wild, they often grow along creek beds or in sandier soils, but some species do extremely well in clay as well. Some species have extensive matting root systems that can help prevent erosion, even with sandier soil.

Still, one thing which should always be avoided is highly alkaline soil.

Too much alkalinity will cause bottle brush trees to suffer yellowing of their leaves from chlorophyll loss. If leaves remain yellow for too long, the plant will die off as it can’t process sunlight properly.

For overall best results, go for a pH range between 5.5 and 7. Work in some compost to add nutrients, and perlite to slightly loosen clay-type soils. If you have sandier soil naturally, skip the perlite and simply work in compost.

Your overall goal is to have a soil which the roots can easily permeate and which remains damp, but not wet. Application of a few inches of mulch around the base of your plant will help keep the soil moist.

Fertilizer

A closeup of a Callistemon glaucus flower. Source: caz15x

I like to use a balanced, slow-release fertilizer for my bottle brush shrub. Applied evenly at the beginning of the spring, summer, and fall, an 8-8-8 slow-release fertilizer will encourage steady growth and flowering.

You don’t need to fertilize in the winter, as the plant simply won’t need added nutrition then.

A little extra phosphorous can help stimulate flower production in the right season and at the right time. The problem is that it needs to be applied a few weeks before normal flowering begins.

If you’re not sure when flowering should happen for your plant, it’s best to stick with a balanced fertilizer.

Propagation From Cuttings

It’s extremely easy to start your bottle brush tree from either seed or cuttings.

For cuttings, you want to take 6-inch cuttings from semi-matured wood. The best time to do this is during the summer. Use sterilized pruners to take the cutting.

Once you have your cutting, pinch off any lower leaves on the stem and any flower buds. Dip your cutting into a rooting hormone powder and then put it into your growth medium. You can use perlite, potting soil, or a number of other starters as growing medium.

Make sure the medium is damp, and then cover the cutting with a plastic bag to help keep moisture inside. You can base-water by setting your potted cutting into a tray of water if necessary, but avoid overwatering.

Wait for the cutting to take root, which should happen within 9-10 weeks, then remove the bag and acclimate your plant to the lower humidity before repotting.

Propagation From Seed

A closeup of seed pods from callistemon linearis. Source: John Tann

If you have seed, it’s simple enough to plant, but it will take a bit longer for your plant to become hardened to the weather. To give it the best chance, sow your seed during the springtime in a balanced potting mix.

As bottle brush plant seeds are extremely tiny, they will resemble dust. This means you’re likely to sow them rather heavily, but that’s okay. Thin down excess plants and keep the strongest specimens as they appear. Try to leave a few inches of space between plants.

Once they’re at least 6-8 inches in size, you can gently separate them and repot them.

Keep in mind that if you are growing different varieties of bottlebrush plants, they hybridize easily. The best way to keep the same features as the parent plant is to take cuttings.

If you’re only growing one variety, the seeds should produce true clones of their parent plant in most cases.

Transplanting

Transplanting your bottle brush requires some preparation of the soil. Read the “soil” segment above for more information.

For older bottlebrush trees, you will want to prepare a hole based on the size of the current plant roots. If the roots have a foot and a half spread, for instance, you want to prepare a hole that’s at least two feet deep and three feet across at the topmost point.

Preparing the soil in advance loosens it and makes it easier for the roots to spread out in. As much of the root mass will be a tangled mat near the surface, you need to ensure that there’s plenty of room for those roots to adapt to!

Young plants need a smaller prepared space. A good rule of thumb is double the root mass in width, and at least 1.5 times the root mass deep. This gives plenty of good aeration.

Potted bottle brush shrubs should be given 3-6 extra inches of space in their pot when transplanting to a new pot.

Pruning

This Callistemon linearis has been trained in an espalier style. Source: wallygrom

There are two types of pruning which are commonly done for bottlebrush shrubs or trees: tip pruning, or flower pruning.

Tip pruning should be done when the new growth is still extremely young, and before it’s had the chance for the stem to harden in any way.

As flowers will grow from these tips, you may sacrifice some flowers if you prune the stems too late. However, this will help you shape the plant if necessary.

Flower pruning is done just as the flowers are beginning to fade. Neatly snip off the flower just behind the lowest set of blossoms, leaving as much stem intact as you can. This may spur additional flower growth from the same stem.

You can prune to train your bottle brush plant to a specific growth pattern. Bottle brush trees also work well for the traditional practice of espalier, or training against a wall or building.

Collecting Seeds

The seed pod on the left is nearly ready to harvest. The one on the right isn’t dry yet. Source: John Tann

If you want to gather seed from your bottlebrush tree, be sure to leave the flowers intact even after they’ve faded. That flower stalk is where the seed pods grow.

Pollinated flower stalks will form seed heads filled with multiple seed pods. Initially, these will be greenish, but over time they will dry to a dark, hardened brown.

As they start reaching the brown and hardened stage, place a paper bag over the top and rubberband it in place beneath the seedhead securely. Wait for a bit longer, and then cut off the stem below the seedhead and leave it to completely dry out.

The seed pods will open on their own as long as they’re kept in a warm, dry place, and a good shake will release the seed into the paper bag.

Scale insect damage on bottle brush tree. Source: Doug Beckers

The majority of your problems will arise from overwatering. But there are a few pests which can attack your bottle brush. Let’s go through the possible issues that might arise and how to deal with them.

Growing Problems

Winter’s chill can cause leaf browning on your bottle brush tree. But do not panic! As long as the branches themselves are not dead, it can recover.

If you’ve had a sudden cold snap, consider wrapping plastic or burlap around your plants to keep them a little warmer.

Be sure to leave ventilation at the top and underside of the plant so you don’t develop powdery mildew or leaf spot. Remove it as soon as the weather warms back up.

Pests

There are a few pests that attack bottle brush: sawfly larvae, scale, and the web moth (also referred to as the webbing caterpillar).

The sawfly itself will not harm your plants, but their larvae assuredly will. These sawfly larvae cause skeletonization of leaves and defoliation.

You can eliminate the larvae with a number of products including neem oil or a more potent azadirachtin spray like AzaMax. Also consider spinosad sprays like Monterey Garden Insect Spray, or even dusting the plant with diatomaceous earth.

Scale insects are a bit more irritating, as they can be hard to spot hidden on the underside of leaves. These cause pale trails to form through your bottle brush leaves.

For small infestations, you can carefully scrape the scale off, or blast it off with hard sprays of water. Larger infestations respond well to the use of neem oil or AzaMax.

Finally, the most destructive pest to bottle brush shrubs is the web moth, also known as the webbing caterpillar. These pests will attack younger foliage, webbing it together to form a cocoon. They can defoliate plants quickly, and one of their favorite targets is the bottle brush.

If you see any branches or leaves pulled together to form a cocoon, or dust that looks like sawdust near a web-coated section of branch, remove it immediately and dispose of it. This should remove the web moth larvae.

While I don’t know if it’s been tested against webbing caterpillars, bacillus thurigiensis (also known as BT) should help destroy these larvae. It’s certainly worth the effort!

Use a product such as Monterey BT if you wish to see if the bacillus will deal with your caterpillar problem, being sure to thoroughly soak through any cocoons to hit the webbing caterpillars within.

I really dislike suggesting inorganic methods to combat a pest. However, if you do not trim off visible cocoons and the BT doesn’t work, you may have to resort to the use of a carbaryl insecticide such as Sevin. This is known to be extremely effective against web moth larvae.

Diseases

Root rot can affect bottle brush trees if the soil is consistently too wet. This soggy soil promotes the growth of fungi that cause the root rot. It can cause yellowing of leaves, discoloration of the trunk, dying back of branches, and can lead to plant death.

To avoid this, water your bottle brush plant only when it needs it, and water slowly but deeply to allow water to penetrate the soil and drain off well. If necessary, apply a copper-based fungicide such as Bonide Copper Fungicide as a soil drench to try to kill off the fungal growth.

Another disease, stem disease, develops also from overwatering. Stem disease is a bacterial issue that also enters at the roots but travels to the branches. It causes stunted, thin branch growth and can slowly kill your plant.

Ensuring your plant has full sun will help water evaporate from the soil more quickly, but the easiest way to avoid this is to simply not overwater. Treatment is withholding water until the soil is dry, then only water enough to just barely dampen the soil.

Limit the plant’s exposure to water until it recovers from the bacterial infection, and prune damaged branches. Be sure to sterilize your pruners to avoid cross-contamination.

Powdery mildew is caused by dampness on leaves where yet another fungus can develop. This one, at least, is relatively easy to treat! Spray all plant surfaces, both tops and bottoms, with neem oil. Retreat every few days until the powdery mildew is gone.

Leaf spot is the final fungal growth that can become a problem.

While a few spotted leaves won’t harm anything, if the fungal growth spreads throughout the plant’s leaves it can cause plant death. Avoid watering the foliage, which is where the fungi develops if it remains wet for too long. Ensure the plant has plenty of airflow around it to keep leaves dry.

Ready to benefit from the bounty of beneficial pollinators that your bottle brush bush will bring? (Boy, that’s a lot of B-words!) In all honesty, these white, pink, or red bottle brush trees are beautiful additions to your landscaping, and they’re surprisingly easy to take care of once established. What’s your favorite shade of bottle brush tree? Tell me below!


Fragrant Plants

Add fragrance to your garden and experience nature's perfect perfumes with our wide selection of wonderfully fragrant plants. We have a huge selection of enticing Jasmines, Gardenias, Sweet Olives, Banana Magnolias, Sweet Almond Verbena as well as many others that are sure to make your nose take notice.

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Aimee Gardenia, Aimee Yoshioka Cape Jasmine

Gardenia jasminoides 'Aimee Yoshioka', G. augusta

Huge 4-5" double blooms are intensely fragrant! Aimee Yoshioka is the largest flowered of all Gardenias with large, glossy, dark green foliage on a vigorous and moderately fast growing evergreen shrub. The large dark foliage provides a wonderful foil for the large white flowers. Easily trained into a tree standard. Aimee is also considered to be one of the largest growing Gardenias, particularly in mild winter climates where it is known to reach 10-12' high but 5-6' may be more typical. Item# 1154.


Watch the video: Learn how do plants grow