Information About Agrimony

Information About Agrimony

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Agrimony Plant Info: Learn How To Grow Agrimony Herbs

By Mary H. Dyer, Credentialed Garden Writer

Agrimony is a perennial herb that has been tagged with a variety of interesting names over the centuries. This ancient herb has a rich history and is valued to this day by herbalists around the world. Click here to learn how to grow agrimony herbs in your own garden.


I Planted a Bradford Pear Tree. Here's Why I Won't Do It Again

No, it wasn't because of the pungent smell. This tree can take a toll on the environment.

'Bradford' pear trees are the trees people love to hate. Notorious for their funky-smelling flowers, these blooming trees are a sign of spring in many placesbut that's not to say they're welcomed with smiling faces. The invasiveness of 'Bradford' pears has become so bad that a county in Kentucky is offering a free alternative tree to anyone who cuts down a 'Bradford' in their yard. Years ago, I decided to pass on the rumors of this infamous callery pear cultivar and plant an alternate instead, because I believe every plant deserves a chance. Plus, how beautiful are those white flowers? Here's what I learned."


Interactions ?

Moderate Interaction

Be cautious with this combination

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with AGRIMONY

Agrimony might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking agrimony along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.
Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.


How to Prune Roses

1. Make your pruning cuts at a 45-degree angle, about 1/4 inch above a leaf axle with a dormant eye.

2. Choose an eye on the outside of the cane and slope the cut down and away on the opposite side. This allows excess natural sap to rise and seal the cut without interfering with the developing eye. Cutting a rose bush to an outward-facing bud also promotes outward growth, opens up the plant to air circulation, creates more pleasing shapes, resists disease, and prevents the canes from becoming a tangle. Cuts closer to the eye than 1/4 inch may damage it. Cuts higher than that will leave a visible stubble—a haven for both pests and disease.

3. If the rose bush has foliage present, the location for your cut is easy to spot. Where there is no foliage to guide you, find the dormant eye by locating where the foliage was once connected. The eye is normally visible as a slight swelling above the surface of the cane.

4. Use this same pruning technique when cutting stems for display and when removing spent blooms. For rose bush care, remember to sharpen your pruning tools periodically—either do it yourself or have someone do it who is specially trained.

5. Wipe metal surfaces after each use with a soft, lightly oiled rag to prevent rust. Store tools in a dry area.


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