Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus (Seven Stars)

Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus (Seven Stars)

Scientific Name

Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus (Wats.) Gerhart Frank

Accepted Scientific Name

Ariocarpus retusus Scheidw.

Common Names

Seven Stars, Living Rock

Synonyms

Ariocarpus furfuraceus, Anhalonium furfuraceum, Mammillaria furfuracea

Scientific Classification

Family: Cactaceae
Subfamily: Cactoideae
Tribe: Cacteae
Genus: Ariocarpus

Description

Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus is a slow-growing, solitary, geophyte cactus with tubercles slightly projecting above ground level. It differs from the standard form of Ariocarpus retusus only for its equilaterally triangular tubercles. All the other characteristics clearly show that they are conspecific. The stem is grey-green, flattened, globose, rounded on top, up to 5 inches (12.5 cm) tall, and up to 10 inches (25 cm) in diameter. The flowers are diurnal, white to pinkish, up to 0.8 inches (2 cm) long, and up to 2 inches (5 cm) in diameter.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 10a to 11b: from 30 °F (−1.1 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

You should plant your Ariocarpus in soil specifically formulated for cacti. You can buy a cactus mix at your local nursery. Do not use generic soil mixes because they will not provide enough aeration and drainage. Additionally, using a container without a hole, whether it is a pot or a terrarium, is a bad idea for the same reason.

Ariocarpus need a lot of sun. However, in hot, dry areas, they can be damaged by excessive sunlight, so you should either use a shade-cloth to limit their sun or move them out of the sun during the hottest hours of the day. In more temperate areas, direct sunlight is fine.

These cacti prefer to be kept at room temperature or slightly lower and in low humidity.

Water your Ariocarpus when it is dry, but then wait until the soil dries out completely to water it again. The amount of time this takes will vary depending on your climate and the size of your pot if you use one.

Learn more at How to Grow and Care for Ariocarpus.

Origin

Ariocarpus retusus is naive to Mexico (widely distributed in Coahuila, San Luis Potosi, Tamaulipas, Zacatecas and Nuevo Leon).

Links

  • Back to genus Ariocarpus
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Ariocarpus Species, Chaute, Living Rock Cactus, Peyote Cimarron, Seven Stars

Family: Cactaceae (kak-TAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Ariocarpus (ar-ree-oh-KAR-pus) (Info)
Species: retusus (re-TOO-sus) (Info)
Synonym:Ariocarpus retusus subsp. retusus
Synonym:Ariocarpus fulvilligeris
Synonym:Anhalonium prismaticum
Synonym:Anhalonium areolosum

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

From seed direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed clean and dry seeds

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Gardeners' Notes:

On May 12, 2005, Xenomorf from Phoenix, AZ (Zone 9b) wrote:

Other valid synonyms are:
Mammillaria prismatica, Anhalonium pulvilligerum, Anhalonium elongatum, Ariocarpus pulvilligeris

Here are other forms/varieties or tenative subspecies still under scrutiny:
Ariocarpus retusus subsp. scapharostroides
Ariocarpus retusus subsp. horacekii [syn. A. elongatus subsp. horacekii]
Ariocarpus retusus subsp. jarmilae
Ariocarpus retusus subsp. panarottoi

This species and all subspecies are on the endangered/protected species list.
The 'retusus' subspecies has a gray-green or blue-green epidermis and the tubercles are not curved sharply and not sharply pointed in relation to the other subspecies. It's flowers are white or pinkish-white. This is the most common of the subspecies.
The. read more 'trigonus' subspecies usually has a yellow-green epidermis and the tubercles are more pointed and incurved. It does not have areole pads at the tubercle tips like 'retusus'. The flowers are yellow or cream colored.
The 'furfuraceus' variety has a darker green-brown-gray epidermis and more obese tubercles.

On Mar 4, 2005, salvia_lover from Modi'in,
Israel wrote:

This plant requires a minimum temperature of 50F/10C.

On Feb 27, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is probably the most commonly kept species in this genus, and old specimens can be incredible to look at. It is a very slow growing and odd looking cactus (looks more like a succulent- no spines) and old specimens can be very expensive. It is not a plant that likes a lot of water, though if watered during the growing season, it will take it OK and maybe even make flowers. Watering it too much will easily rot it, though. I have had one of these for 8 years, and I'm not sure it's much larger than it was when I got it. ONe of those plants passed down from generation to generation.


Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus (Seven Stars) - garden

= Ariocarpus furfuraceus C.H.Thomps.
Rep. (Annual) Missouri Bot. Gard. 9: 130, pl. 34. 1898

Accepted Scientific Name: Ariocarpus retusus Scheidw.
Bull. Acad. Roy. Sci. Bruxelles 5: 492 (t. 1). 1838

Origin and Habitat: Widely distributed in Coahuila, San Luis Potosi, Tamaulipas , Zacatecas and Nuevo Leon.

Description: Ariocarpus furfuraceus differs from the standard Ariocarpus retusus only for its equilaterally triangular tubercles, all the other characteristics clearly show that they are conspecific. Ariocarpus retusus is quite variable and has received numerous unnecessary names of no botanical value, representing no more than local phenotypes: Ariocarpus furfuraceus is one of them.
Habit: Solitary, slow-growing geophyte cactus, with tubercles slightly projecting above ground level. The large tuberous body is below the soil.
Stem: Grey-green, flattened, globose, rounded on top, 3-12 cm high, 10-25cm in diameter.
Tubercles: The distinctive characteristic of Ariocarpus furfuaraceus are the tubercles, which are equilaterally triangular shaped, divergent, convex or nearly flattened adaxially and often with shallow adaxial undulations or wrinkling, not fissured, 1,5-4 cm long, 1-3,5 cm wide, nearly as wide as long.
Areoles: At the tips of the tubercles, rounded, 1-5 mm in diameter.
Flowers: Diurnal, 4-5 cm in diameter, 2-4 2cm long, white to clear pink.
Root: Tap root.
Flowering time: Autumn.
Remarks: All of the Ariocarpus seedlings are spiny and quite different from adult specimens, though the spines are feather-like.
Fruit: White, green, or rarely pinkish, 10-25 mm long, 3-10 mm in diameter.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Ariocarpus retusus group

  • Ariocarpus confusus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2078/Ariocarpus_confusus'> Ariocarpus confusus Halda & Horáček : intermediates between Ariocarpus retususand Ariocarpus trigonus flower color, white through to magenta, a color not found in any other populations. Distribution: Aramberri region.
  • Ariocarpus elongatus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2096/Ariocarpus_elongatus'> Ariocarpus elongatus (Salm-Dyck) Wettst. : has longer an narrower tubercles than Ariocarpus retusus. Distribution: Huizache, San Luis Potosí.
  • Ariocarpus furfuraceus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2081/Ariocarpus_furfuraceus'> Ariocarpus furfuraceus C.H.Thomps. : has equilaterally triangular shaped tubercles.
  • Ariocarpus furfuraceus f. cristata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2124/Ariocarpus_furfuraceus_f._cristata'> Ariocarpus furfuraceus f. cristata Frič : crested form.
  • Ariocarpus furfuraceus f. monstruosus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/14366/Ariocarpus_furfuraceus_f._monstruosus'> Ariocarpus furfuraceus f. monstruosus hort. : Free branching plants with thinner elongated stems and copious production of wool. There are several different clones.
  • Ariocarpus furfuraceus var. rostratus A.Berger : (Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus ''rostratus'')Refers to plants with a more tapered apex to the tubercle.
  • Ariocarpus retusus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2079/Ariocarpus_retusus'> Ariocarpus retusus Scheidw. : (ssp. retusus) Widespread, flowers are cream or white, occasionally with reddish midveins.
  • Ariocarpus retusus f. cristata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/14370/Ariocarpus_retusus_f._cristata'> Ariocarpus retusus f. cristata hort. : is a slow-growing crested cactus forming with fan shaped stems that will slowly forms brain-shaped cushion up to 3-12 cm high and 70 cm in diameter, or more.
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. horacekii" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2085/Ariocarpus_retusus_subs._horacekii'> Ariocarpus retusus subs. horacekii Halda & Panar. : like Ariocarpus trigonus but smaller. Distribution: South of Matehuala, San Luis Potosí.
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. jarmilae Halda, Horáček & Panar. : nomina nuda
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. panarottoi Halda & Horáček : Nomina nuda.
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. pectinatus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2090/Ariocarpus_retusus_subs._pectinatus'> Ariocarpus retusus subs. pectinatus Weisbarth : It has, dull pectinated spines already present in young specimens up to 1,2 to 2,0 mm long. The spines persist with the age. Areoles at the tips and extending on the upper side of the tubercles, elongated 2 to 20 mm long, wooly.
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. scapharostroides Halda & Horáček : Plants from the Villa Juarez region of SLP, it is characterized by erect angular tubercles, superficially reminiscent of Ariocarpus scapharostrus.
  • Ariocarpus retusus var. sladkovskyi Halda & Kupčák
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. trigonus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2093/Ariocarpus_retusus_subs._trigonus'> Ariocarpus retusus subs. trigonus (F.A.C.Weber) E.F.Anderson & W.A.Fitz Maur. : (Ariocarpus retusus ssp. trigonus) Somewhat less widespread with long sharp tubercles twice as long as wide. The flowers are yellow (usually), white to pinkish white.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Cauliflower" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/26227/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Cauliflower'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Cauliflower : has a completely or partially warty skin that gives it an aspect of cauliflower.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Cauliflower King : This is a variant of cv. cauliflower with bigger, if not huge, tubercles giving an overall appearance rather globular.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29850/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Frumdosus'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus : Unlike the type species, this cultivar has not convex, bulging tubers, but flat and smooth giving them an aspect of tetrahedron.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus brevituberosus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29873/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Frumdosus_brevituberosus'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus brevituberosus
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus f. variegata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/35206/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Frumdosus_f._variegata'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus f. variegata
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29844/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Maruibo'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo : Unlike the type species that has more or less triangular tubers, here they take a round shape and looks like small spheres ending with a large woolly areolae.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo Cauliflower" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29846/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Maruibo_Cauliflower'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo Cauliflower : A pretty good combination of "Maruibo" and "Cauliflower" character.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo Pectinatus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29845/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Maruibo_Pectinatus'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo Pectinatus : is characterized by the swollen tubercles of "Maruibo" together with the very woolly and sometimes prickly central groove of "Pectinatus".
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Mituibo" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29847/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Mituibo'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Mituibo : (a.k.a. cv. Three Finger or Tresfinger)The tip of each tubercles is split into three points as three fingers, a bit like a trident with a large central section and two smaller ones on each side.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Tama Botan" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/14367/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Tama_Botan'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Tama Botan : (a.k.a. Ariocarpus retusus var. major) It is a cultivated selection with very wide leaflike, divergent tubercles. The tubercles are 3,5 to 5 cm wide, and are as wide as long or wider in adult specimens.

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Edward F. Anderson “The Cactus Family” Timber Press, 2001
2) Curt Backeberg “Cactus Lexicon” Sterling Publishing Company, Incorporated, 1978
3) Hiroshi Hirao “Colour encyclopaedia of cacti” Japan 1979 (Japanese language and script)
4) Willy Cullmann, Erich Götz (Dozent Dr.), Gerhard Gröner “The encyclopedia of cacti” Portland, OR: Timber Press, 1986
5) David Hunt, Nigel Taylor “The New Cactus Lexicon” DH Books, 2006 ISBN 0953813444, 9780953813445
6) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey “The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass” Cambridge University Press, 11/Aug./2011


Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus (Ariocarpus furfuraceus) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus (Ariocarpus furfuraceus) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli
Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus (Ariocarpus furfuraceus) Photo by: Valentino Vallicelli

Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus (Seven Stars) - garden

Origin and Habitat: Ariocarpus retusus is widely distributed from north of Saltillo, Coahuila southwards to San Luis Potosi. Also found occur in Tamaulipas and Zacatecas.
Altitude range: High Chihuahuan desert at altitudes of between 1300 and 2000 metres above sea level. This species grows at lower altitudes (around 200 - 800 metres) of the Sierra Madre Oriental it is replaced by Ariocarpus retusus ssp. trigonus.
Habitat: The species tends to favour limestone and rocky slopes in semi-desert vegetation. The original range of this species extended from Coahuila and Nuevo León in the north to San Luis Potosí in the south. However, much of this range has been modified by agricultural development. A. retusus is a perennial and obligate gypsophile, occurring regularly in Muhlenbergia grassland and Bouteloua grassland in Central Mexico. Ariocarpus species are the only succulents present in the Muhlenbergia grassland. Although A. retusus has a relatively extensive area of distribution and a large population, it has a very low density. It is a slow growing species. This species is threatened by illegal collecting and agricultural development, however, they do not represent major threats. It is found in commercial cultivation.

  • Ariocarpus retusus Scheidw.
    • Anhalonium areolosum Lem.
    • Anhalonium prismaticum Lem.
    • Anhalonium pulvilligerum Lem.
    • Anhalonium retusum Salm-Dyck
    • Cactus prismaticus Kuntze
    • Mammillaria areolosa Hemsl.
    • Mammillaria prismatica Hemsl.

Description: Ariocarpus retususus commonly known as the "Star Rock" is one of the largest species that distinguishes for the fat triangular tubercles forming a starry rosette. It is a widespread and extremely variable plant. Tubercle size and shape vary widely, a terminal areole is sometimes present at the tip. The vast amount of phenotypic variation in the species has led to the erection of several variants and has received numerous unnecessary names of no botanical value.
Habit: Solitary, slow growing geophyte cactus with tubercles slightly projecting above ground level. The flat tuberous body is below the soil.
Stem: Grey, or blue-green, flattened, globose, rounded on top, 3-12 cm high, 10-25 cm in diameter.
Tubercles: Leaf-like, divergent, erect, basally compressed, usually becoming attenuate at the apices, convex or nearly flattened adaxially and often with shallow adaxial undulations or wrinkling, not fissured, 1,5-4 cm long, 1-3,5 cm wide, nearly as wide as long.
Areoles: At the tips of the tubercles, rounded, 1-5 mm in diameter often only on younger specimens.
Flowers: Diurnal 4-5cm in diameter, 2-4,2 cm long, white to pink (or magenta), occasionally with reddish midribs.
Roots: Tap root.
Flowering time: Autumn.
Fruits: White, green, or rarely pinkish, 10-25 mm long, 3-10 mm in diameter.
Remarks: All of the Ariocarpus seedlings are spiny and quite different from adult specimens, though the spines are feather-like.

Subspecies, varieties, forms and cultivars of plants belonging to the Ariocarpus retusus group

  • Ariocarpus confusus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2078/Ariocarpus_confusus'> Ariocarpus confusus Halda & Horáček : intermediates between Ariocarpus retususand Ariocarpus trigonus flower color, white through to magenta, a color not found in any other populations. Distribution: Aramberri region.
  • Ariocarpus elongatus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2096/Ariocarpus_elongatus'> Ariocarpus elongatus (Salm-Dyck) Wettst. : has longer an narrower tubercles than Ariocarpus retusus. Distribution: Huizache, San Luis Potosí.
  • Ariocarpus furfuraceus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2081/Ariocarpus_furfuraceus'> Ariocarpus furfuraceus C.H.Thomps. : has equilaterally triangular shaped tubercles.
  • Ariocarpus furfuraceus f. cristata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2124/Ariocarpus_furfuraceus_f._cristata'> Ariocarpus furfuraceus f. cristata Frič : crested form.
  • Ariocarpus furfuraceus f. monstruosus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/14366/Ariocarpus_furfuraceus_f._monstruosus'> Ariocarpus furfuraceus f. monstruosus hort. : Free branching plants with thinner elongated stems and copious production of wool. There are several different clones.
  • Ariocarpus furfuraceus var. rostratus A.Berger : (Ariocarpus retusus var. furfuraceus ''rostratus'')Refers to plants with a more tapered apex to the tubercle.
  • Ariocarpus retusus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2079/Ariocarpus_retusus'> Ariocarpus retusus Scheidw. : (ssp. retusus) Widespread, flowers are cream or white, occasionally with reddish midveins.
  • Ariocarpus retusus f. cristata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/14370/Ariocarpus_retusus_f._cristata'> Ariocarpus retusus f. cristata hort. : is a slow-growing crested cactus forming with fan shaped stems that will slowly forms brain-shaped cushion up to 3-12 cm high and 70 cm in diameter, or more.
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. horacekii" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2085/Ariocarpus_retusus_subs._horacekii'> Ariocarpus retusus subs. horacekii Halda & Panar. : like Ariocarpus trigonus but smaller. Distribution: South of Matehuala, San Luis Potosí.
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. jarmilae Halda, Horáček & Panar. : nomina nuda
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. panarottoi Halda & Horáček : Nomina nuda.
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. pectinatus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2090/Ariocarpus_retusus_subs._pectinatus'> Ariocarpus retusus subs. pectinatus Weisbarth : It has, dull pectinated spines already present in young specimens up to 1,2 to 2,0 mm long. The spines persist with the age. Areoles at the tips and extending on the upper side of the tubercles, elongated 2 to 20 mm long, wooly.
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. scapharostroides Halda & Horáček : Plants from the Villa Juarez region of SLP, it is characterized by erect angular tubercles, superficially reminiscent of Ariocarpus scapharostrus.
  • Ariocarpus retusus var. sladkovskyi Halda & Kupčák
  • Ariocarpus retusus subs. trigonus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/2093/Ariocarpus_retusus_subs._trigonus'> Ariocarpus retusus subs. trigonus (F.A.C.Weber) E.F.Anderson & W.A.Fitz Maur. : (Ariocarpus retusus ssp. trigonus) Somewhat less widespread with long sharp tubercles twice as long as wide. The flowers are yellow (usually), white to pinkish white.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Cauliflower" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/26227/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Cauliflower'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Cauliflower : has a completely or partially warty skin that gives it an aspect of cauliflower.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Cauliflower King : This is a variant of cv. cauliflower with bigger, if not huge, tubercles giving an overall appearance rather globular.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29850/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Frumdosus'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus : Unlike the type species, this cultivar has not convex, bulging tubers, but flat and smooth giving them an aspect of tetrahedron.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus brevituberosus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29873/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Frumdosus_brevituberosus'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus brevituberosus
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus f. variegata" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/35206/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Frumdosus_f._variegata'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Frumdosus f. variegata
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29844/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Maruibo'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo : Unlike the type species that has more or less triangular tubers, here they take a round shape and looks like small spheres ending with a large woolly areolae.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo Cauliflower" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29846/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Maruibo_Cauliflower'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo Cauliflower : A pretty good combination of "Maruibo" and "Cauliflower" character.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo Pectinatus" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29845/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Maruibo_Pectinatus'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Maruibo Pectinatus : is characterized by the swollen tubercles of "Maruibo" together with the very woolly and sometimes prickly central groove of "Pectinatus".
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Mituibo" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/29847/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Mituibo'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Mituibo : (a.k.a. cv. Three Finger or Tresfinger)The tip of each tubercles is split into three points as three fingers, a bit like a trident with a large central section and two smaller ones on each side.
  • Ariocarpus retusus cv. Tama Botan" href='/Encyclopedia/CACTI/Family/Cactaceae/14367/Ariocarpus_retusus_cv._Tama_Botan'> Ariocarpus retusus cv. Tama Botan : (a.k.a. Ariocarpus retusus var. major) It is a cultivated selection with very wide leaflike, divergent tubercles. The tubercles are 3,5 to 5 cm wide, and are as wide as long or wider in adult specimens.

Bibliography: Major references and further lectures
1) Edward F. Anderson “The Cactus Family” Timber Press, 2001
2) Curt Backeberg “Cactus Lexicon” Sterling Publishing Company, Incorporated, 1978
3) Hiroshi Hirao “Colour encyclopaedia of cacti” Japan 1979 (Japanese language and script)
4) Willy Cullmann, Erich Götz (Dozent Dr.), Gerhard Gröner “The encyclopedia of cacti” Portland, OR: Timber Press, 1986
5) David Hunt, Nigel Taylor “The New Cactus Lexicon” DH Books, 2006
6) James Cullen, Sabina G. Knees, H. Suzanne Cubey “The European Garden Flora Flowering Plants: A Manual for the Identification of Plants Cultivated in Europe, Both Out-of-Doors and Under Glass” Cambridge University Press, 11/Aug./2011
7) Fitz Maurice, B & Fitz Maurice, W.A. 2013. "Ariocarpus retusus." The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. . Downloaded on 12 December 2014.


- ( Living Rock or Seven Stars ) Only the leaf-like rosette of tubercles is visible on this plant. This is the largest species of the genus. It is also one of the easiest and fastest to grow. It might still take 6-10 years, to go from seeds to flowering size. Photo by: Andrea B.
In habitat Mexico. Photo by: Agócs György
Ariocarpus retusus LH453 Las Tablas Photo by: Cactus Art

Watch the video: ariocarpus retusus san luis