Tendersweet Cabbage Plants – How To Grow Tendersweet Cabbages

Tendersweet Cabbage Plants – How To Grow Tendersweet Cabbages

By: Mary H. Dyer, Credentialed Garden Writer

What is Tendersweet cabbage? As the name suggests, plants of this cabbage variety produce tender, sweet, thin leaves that are perfect for stir fries or coleslaw. Like all members of this family, Tendersweet cabbage can handle frost but will suffer in hot weather.

When it comes to growing Tendersweet cabbage, it’s best to get started in early spring. However, you can also grow a crop for fall harvest in milder climates.

How to Grow Tendersweet Cabbages

Plant seeds indoors four to six weeks ahead of the lastexpected frost in your region. This is the best plan if you want to harvestcabbage before the hottest part of summer. You can also purchase young plantsat your local garden center.

Prepare a sunny garden spot before transplanting seedlingsinto the garden. Work the soil well and dig in 2 to 4 inches (5-10 cm.) ofcompost or well-rotted manure.Additionally, dig in a dry, all-purposefertilizer according to recommendations on the container.

If you prefer, you can plant Tendersweet cabbage seedsdirectly in the garden. Prepare the soil, then plant a group of three or fourseeds, allowing 12 inches (30 cm.) between each group. If you’re planting inrows, allow 24 to 36 inches of space (around 1 meter) between each row. Thinthe seedlings to one seed per group when they have three or four leaves.

Caring for Tendersweet Cabbage Plants

Water plants as needed to keep the soil evenly moist. Don’tallow the soil to remain soggy or to become bone dry, as extreme fluctuationsin moisture may result in a bitter, unpleasant flavor or may cause the heads tosplit.

If possible, water at the base of the plant, using a dripirrigation system or soakerhose. Too much moisture when growing Tendersweet leaves and heads mayinvite powderymildew, blackrot, or other diseases. Watering early in the day is always better thanwatering in the evening.

Apply a light application of all-purpose garden fertilizerabout a month after the cabbage plants are transplanted or thinned. Place the fertilizerin a band along the rows, and then water deeply to distribute the fertilizeraround the roots.

Spread 3 to 4 inches (8-10 cm.) of mulch, such as straw orchopped leaves, around the plants to keep the soil cool and moist. Remove smallweeds as they appear but be careful not to damage the roots of the plants.

Harvestcabbage plants when the heads are plump and firm and have reached anacceptable size. Don’t wait; once the cabbage is ready, the headswill split if left in the garden too long.

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Companion Planting For Cabbage

Author: Marlene Affeld // Last updated on December 7, 2020 1 Comment

Companion planting is one of the very best ways to keep cabbage plants healthy and free from insect pests such cabbage loopers, cabbage root maggots, slugs, flea beetles, diamondback moth, and aphids. Cabbage is easy to grow in the homestead garden if you select varieties suitable to your United States Plant Hardiness Zone, enhance the soil, and control insects and disease.

In this post, I’ll tell you which companion plants grow best with cabbage. I’ll also tell you about some of my favorite varieties of cabbage, cabbage-growing tips, and share my favorite cabbage recipe.

Kat Sommers/Flickr

Green cabbage is the most popular type of cabbage and includes several varieties such as the Danish cabbage

The most common variety of cabbage is green cabbage (Brassica oleracea). The large round cabbage head has densely packed thick leaves. The outer leaves of the cabbage head are usually medium to light green and they fade to pale green or white the closer they are to the center.

Green cabbages can range in size from 1 lb. to 9 lbs (0.5 – 4 kg). You can slice, steam, sauté, or braise most types of green cabbage. Green cabbages are usually eaten raw and are the main ingredients in coleslaw recipes.

When consumed raw, green cabbage can have a slight peppery taste to it. However, cooking cabbage gives them a sweeter taste with less spiciness. Another way to eat cabbage is by fermenting it to create sauerkraut.

Some popular green cabbage varieties include the following:

  • Danish cabbage – Compact and solid type of cabbage which include some of the most popular and common cultivars.
  • Domesticcabbage – This type of cabbage has looser heads with curled leaves.
  • Pointed cabbage – Have small, conical head with more open leaves with softer texture.

Danish Ballhead Cabbage

Varieties of Danish cabbages such as the Danish Ballhead are some of the most common green cabbage cultivars.

The Danish Ballhead cabbage is a large green leafy variety of cabbage. The cabbage has crisp, tender and tightly packed leaves that are a blueish-green color. The leathery leaves form to create a large round cabbage head that can weigh between 7 and 10 lbs (3 – 4.5 kg).

As with green cabbage, Danish cabbage varieties are late-fall cabbages that keep well throughout the winter.

The firm crisp leaves make this a great type of cabbage to make sauerkraut or delicious slaw.

Cannonball Cabbage

Cannonball cabbages are a green popular cabbage cultivar that have small, firm heads and tender sweet leaves.

As their name suggests, Cannonball cabbages have a tightly-packed small head. Due to its green color and shape, some people describe cannonball cabbages as massive Brussels sprouts.

Because the green leaves that make up the head are so tightly packed, this is a perfect choice for shredding. You can then use the shredded cabbage to make coleslaw, sauerkraut, or add to soups or stews.

Gonzales Cabbage

Gonzales is another type of small, compact green cabbage that has a spicy flavor and firm texture.

Similar to other types of green cabbages, the green outer leaves cover densely packed pale green and white leaves. Gonzales cabbages have a good, robust flavor and will help to add crunch and a peppery taste to coleslaw or salads.

To grow this type of cabbage in your garden, you need an area that gets plenty of sunshine. This is also a cold hardy type of cabbage and grows well in many conditions.


Description

Midsize, flat heads stand well without splitting. Tender leaves are very thin, sweet, and crisp – perfect for coleslaw or stir-fries. Widely adapted for spring, summer, and early fall harvest.

Care: Plant 12-18″ apart in rows 24-36″ apart in sun. Matures best in cool, uniformly moist soil.

Late-season vegetables adapted to tolerate both the heat of late summer and the cool nights of fall. Harvest in late summer or fall. See our Fall & Winter Vegetable Guide for specific planting/harvest times & freeze-out temperatures.

Midsize, flat heads stand well without splitting. Tender leaves are very thin, sweet, and crisp – perfect for coleslaw or stir-fries. Widely adapted for spring, summer, and early fall harvest.

Care: Plant 12-18″ apart in rows 24-36″ apart in sun. Matures best in cool, uniformly moist soil.

Late-season vegetables adapted to tolerate both the heat of late summer and the cool nights of fall. Harvest in late summer or fall. See our Fall & Winter Vegetable Guide for specific planting/harvest times & freeze-out temperatures.


Watch the video: How To Learn Planting Cabbages