Repotting Jade Plants: Learn How To Repot A Jade Plant

Repotting Jade Plants: Learn How To Repot A Jade Plant

By: Becca Badgett, Co-author of How to Grow an EMERGENCY Garden

Jade plants are among the most popular of succulent plants for both indoors and outside. There are many types of jade plants. If you have one that seems to be outgrowing its container, it might be time to consider jade repotting.

When Should I Repot Jade Plants?

You might think of repotting jade plants if they’ve stopped growing or if they appear too crowded. Overcrowding in the container is not bad for the plant, but it does limit more growth. Jade plants grow to the size their root system allows, often reaching three feet.

Professionals say small jade plants should be repotted every two or three years, while larger plants can wait four or five years. Increase the container size with each repotting. Usually, going one size larger is appropriate.

How to Repot a Jade Plant

When you’ve decided your jade is ready for a new container, make sure the soil is dry. Start fresh soil and a new, clean container that is larger. Begin the process by gently using a spade or other flat tool to slide around the inside edges of the container. This helps loosen a root system that may be clinging to the walls of the pot.

Depending on the size of the plant and container, you may turn it upside down to let it slide out or pull gently by the stem at the soil area. If the plant has several stems, gently circle them with your thumb and fingers and flip the pot upside down. If roots seem stuck near the bottom, work them out with a clean tool.

For plants with multiple branches, this might be a good time to divide into two plants. This is just an additional option while you’ve got it out of the pot. If you choose to divide your jade plant make one clean, quick cut with a sharp tool through the center of the root ball.

When the plant is out of the pot, tease out the roots to see how much growth you can expect. Remove as much of the old soil as possible. It is rarely necessary to trim roots of a jade plant, but a slight trim sometimes encourages growth in the new container.

When repotting jade plants, place it as deeply as possible into the new container without the leaves touching the soil. As jade plants grow, the stem will thicken, and they will look more like a tree. They’ll get taller and put out new leaves when settled in.

Wait at least two weeks to water, longer if bottom leaves don’t crinkle. This allows root damage to heal and new growth to get started.

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Read more about Jade Plants


How to Grow Jade Plant Indoors

The Spruce / Leticia Almeida

The jade plant is a popular succulent houseplant with fleshy, oval-shaped leaves and thick, woody stems that resemble tiny tree trunks. With a bit of easy care, it can grow to be between 3 and 6 feet tall, but does so slowly, only growing about two inches a year.

Native to South Africa, jade plants were once thought to bring good luck to their owners, so they were often given as housewarming gifts. Because they're typically only grown indoors, they can be brought home or started any time, either from a professional nursery or through propagation.

Botanical Name Crassula ovata
Common Name Jade plant
Plant Type Succulent
Mature Size 3–6 ft. tall, 2–3 ft. wide
Sun Exposure Full sun
Soil Type Well-drained
Soil pH Neutral to acidic
Bloom Time Spring (rarely blooms indoors)
Flower Color White
Hardiness Zones 11–12 (USDA)
Native Area South Africa
Toxicity Toxic to dogs and cats

Watch Now: How to Grow and Care for Jade Plants


Propagating a jade plant | Leaf method

If you’ve ever propagated succulents before, you might know that for many species all you need is a single leaf. If you have leaves, whether freshly plucked or fallen, you can use these to create new jade plants to enjoy!

To get your leaves, you can gently pluck from the stems of a jade plant. Make sure the whole leaf comes off. Giving it a gentle twist can help.

Just like with the stem cuttings, you’ll want to give your leaves a few days to heal over to prepare them for the propagation process. Once you have them in hand, you can again choose between propagating in water or soil.

Did you know? Most plants can’t be propagated from just leaves. It’s something mostly limited to succulents and semi-succulents.

Gorelick, 2015.

The soil method

The soil method is the easiest way of propagating jade plant leaves. Literally all you have to do is lay the leaves on the soil in such a way that they touch it. That is all!

The great thing about using leaves is that you can put a lot of them into the same pot to increase your chances of success. The resulting plants will be extremely tiny at first and can be separated into individual planters once they’ve grown a bit.

Once you have all your leaves in the soil, move them into bright, indirect sunlight and spray every few days to keep the soil ever so lightly moist. When roots and baby plants have started appearing, you can slowly make the switch to a regular succulent watering schedule.

The water method

You can do the water method for your leaf cuttings. It tends to be more troublesome since you have to come up with ways of keeping the leaves upright.

It’s not impossible, though. Use mesh or toothpicks to suspend the leaf, preferably in a small shot glass.


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I just got this new jade plant yesterday. It's currently in a pot that is too small as the plant is too heavy for it and makes it tilt. Person who I got the plant from told me it's been In this pot for a while. The jade plant was watered yesterday before I brought it home. Question I have is can I repot this plant in a new heavier pot this weekend while the soil won't be dry? If so, once I repot should I water again or wait until the new soil feels completely dry? Would like to repot this weekend as the current pot is not stable . See pic below

Your Jade needs as much sun as you can give it - hours a day. The new stems look good but the original one didn't get enough light.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming. "WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

President: Orchid Society of Northern Nevada
Webmaster: osnnv.org

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming. "WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost


2. year round

  • The plant is struggling due to poor drainage. It’s tough to distinguish signs of poor drainage from those of over and under-watering, or even lack of humidity. However, if your plant is struggling and it’s in a pot without draining holes, don’t question whether it’s a watering or a draining problem. Just get it out of there! Don’t wait until the Spring!
  • The plant is infested with pests. Pests can be hard to identify. If you notice little bugs on their leaves and a sticky substance all around the plant, it’s aphids. If you notice white, fluffy moving bugs, it’s mealy bugs. If you notice tiny little black bugs concentrated in little webs at the leaf connection with the stem is spider mites. You can blast these 3 bugs with insecticidal soap every 3 days or give your plants a shower. However, if you notice tiny little white bugs jumping around on the topsoil, you need to take your plant out of its pot, shake off its dirt as much as possible and completely wash as much soil off the roots as you can, before repotting it into a new pot with fresh potting mix! (More info on this to come!)

Poor drainage is a major issue for plants. It causes roots to be waterlogged, rot, and decay, which is pretty much a death sentence for a plant. If your plants is suffering due to poor drainage, wait no more! Repot it at once!

Only this time plant it in a pot with drainage holes!

Gnats, thrips, whiteflies, fruit flies, are all common houseplants pests that live on the soil of houseplants. Some are easy to kill with insecticidal soaps or natural home made remedies, but others can be really stubborn. This is when fully washing roots and repotting with fresh soil comes in handy!


How to Repot Large Jade Plants

A jade plant can be a joy for years and years in your home, but after a while it will need repotting to allow the plant to continue to grow roots to support the ever larger branches and leaves. If left untended, a large jade plant is likely to tip over from becoming top heavy. To repot large jade plants be sure to have all of your supplies ready in early spring as the jade starts to show new growth.

Spread out a layer of newspaper on the floor to catch dropped soil. If you can’t move your jade to an open area in your home, then move items around your jade out of the way so you have plenty of room to work around the plant.

Place a large pot over the center of the newspaper. The new pot should be only 2 to 3 inches larger in diameter than the existing pot.

  • A jade plant can be a joy for years and years in your home, but after a while it will need repotting to allow the plant to continue to grow roots to support the ever larger branches and leaves.

Fill the bottom of the pot an inch deep with gravel to help aid in drainage. If you are worried about your plant tipping over, place a brick on top of the gravel to add more weight to the pot.

Pour in succulent soil over the gravel and brick, if using one, to fill the bottom third of the pot. Carefully hold the base of the jade and lift it out of the pot it is in and place it in the center of the new larger pot.

Make sure the top surface of the jade’s root ball is just slightly below the rim of the new pot. Lift the plant, if needed, to add or remove soil. With the jade positioned in the pot, fill in the surrounding areas with fresh soil until the pot is filled.

  • Fill the bottom of the pot an inch deep with gravel to help aid in drainage.
  • With the jade positioned in the pot, fill in the surrounding areas with fresh soil until the pot is filled.

Position the new pot in a sunny area and water the jade as you normally would for its weekly watering. The jade should not need to be repotted again for a number of years.

To make the jade a little easier to remove from its pot, wait a week after your last watering to let the soil dry and become lighter in weight.

Depending on how large your jade is you may want a friend to help you lift it so you don’t end up dropping the plant. While your plant can recover from most damage, it can take years to do so.

Anytime you move the jade be careful not to knock off the leaves of the plant. The slightest bump can be enough for the plant to drop several leaves, and while it won’t harm the plant to lose them, it can make it unshapely.


Watch the video: PLANTING MY JADE PLANT. HOW TO REPOTTING ALL ABOUT US BY SWEETCRAVINGS